Ghost Sickness

This is the belief that ghosts can cause illness and death. Many tribal societies and those that follow and animistic approach believe there is a time period, usually a few days where the soul remains close to its body after death.

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These few days are dangerous to the living because the ghost is lonely and seeks the living for company. Children, because their souls are weaker, and haven’t attached to the body as firmly, are at higher risk. Ghost sickness is part of the reasons behind so many death and funeral customs.

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Elf-Arrows

These arrowhead shaped pieces of flint were used as weapons against animals and people. They were believed to be fatal to cattle. To save a cow that had been shot with an elf-arrow they had to be touched by the arrow, the arrow then needed to be dipped into water and the cow needed to drink the water afterwards.
Sick animals are still said to be elf-shot if they become ill.

elf arrow

If the person were shot with an elf-arrow, they get sick with a mysterious supernatural illness.
In 1560, a Scottish woman was accused of using of elf-arrows. Catherine Ross, Lady Fowllis, along with her son-in-law Hector Munro, and other nameless witches wanted to kill Ross’ husband and Marjorie Campbell, Lady Balnagown. Lady Fowllis wanted to marry Lord Balnagown. The plot was uncovered before anything happened to the victims. Elf-Arrows superstition is strong in Ireland, England, and parts of Scotland.

Image from Google Search.

The Gadillon Family

The 1500s were a great time to find rampant werewolf stories.
This one takes place in 1598 France. The Gandillon family -a sister, her brother and his two children- ravaged an area called Jura in wolf form.

Penette Gandillon believe she was a wolf she would run around on all fours. One day she came upon a small boy and girl -brother and sister- gathering strawberries. Penette was consumed by blood rage and attacked the girl. The boy, a four-year-old, pulled a knife on Penette and defend his sister. Penette slashed at the boy cutting his neck and killing him. Later the girl identified that as her brothers killer.
Outraged peasants attacked Penette and tore her pieces.

Not long after, Pernette’s brother Pierre was accused of witchcraft. Rumors circulated appears kidnapping children and taking them to the witches sabbath. He would make fierce hailstorms and turned himself into a wolf with long shaggy gray hair. The devil gave him a special ointment. He wants changed into a hare once too. He accepted the rumors as truth. He confessed to killing and eating animals and humans and to return to human all he had to do was rolling grass.

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Georges –Pierre’s son- confessed to using the ointment too. While his body lie in a trance state in bed, lasting three hours once he out he attended a witches sabbat. While in wolf form he killed and eaten two goats.
Both father and son had scars on their faces arms hands and legs that they’d received while in wolf form and fighting with dogs.

Antotinette confessed to selling her soul to the devil who appeared to her in the form of a black cat. She created hail while attending sabbats.

Pierre Georges behaved like raging maniacs, running around their cells on all fours and howling. It was believed they didn’t shape-shift into wolf’s because they didn’t have their magical ointment. Father and both his children were convicted hung and burned.

Babylonian Devil Trap

Between the third and first Centuries B.C.E. and the 16th Century C.E., Babylonian Devil Traps were common.
These devil traps were terra-cotta bowls inscribed with magical texts or symbols with the purpose to drive away evil.
1. bowl-bird of rivers-sm

Hebrew slaves in Babylonia changed the words and text to quotes from the Hebrew Scriptures that invoked God.
One bowl was inscribed with the “bill of divorce” from the devil and all of his monsters. It ordered demons to leave town.
How were these bowls used? They were turned upside down, and buried under the four cornerstones of buildings and houses.

Image from Google search

Ladder

Are you superstitious? I am…well sometimes, I am.

under ladder

I didn’t walk under ladders, then I did for a few years and then I didn’t again. I was always told walking under a ladder was bad luck is that what you were told?
Turns out the superstition has a macabre background. Superstitions, witches, macabre…. come on you knew I’d be all over this one.

It seems this originates from colonial America during the witch-hunts. It’s widely believed witches were burned during the witch trials but in England and America, more were hung.
When they dropped, they’d fall below the ladder that led up to the gallows. Common belief said anyone who was touched by a witch especially if she or he was taking their last breath would soon die.

witches ladder

The belief in which is dying curse was so strong townsfolk would stay away from the ladder long after the death to prevent being cursed to death.
Also, witches’ heads were covered before being hung to prevent them from cursing anyone before death.

Images:
http://philosophy-religion.blurtit.com/1377679/what-is-the-origin-of-the-walking-under-a-ladder-superstition
http://rfox52.tripod.com/LydiaGilbert.htm

Porcelnik

We’ve gone over many witches that either act like vampires or turn into a vampire after death.
The Porcelnik is one of those vampires.
In life, the Porcelnik lives in Russia. He’s a human sorcerer that displays vampire activities.

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The town’s people call him Porcelnik or “The Harmer”.
Once the sorcerer dies, the townsfolk burn his body on a pyre of Aspen wood to keep him from rising and becoming an Eretik vampire revenant.

Image found at Pinterest

Colo-Colo

The Araucanian people of Chile have a vampire creature in their mythology.

The Colo-Colo monster is born from a cockerel egg.
egg

It preys on sleeping people hovering over the body and sucking their saliva draining from their body.
The victim wakes with a high fever and dies soon after.

Image from Google search